Sonny Liston Gloves never returned to family, sell for half a million dollars

Ali-Liston gloves going to auction

NEW YORK — Just months before the 50th anniversary of the heavyweight rematch between Muhammad Ali and Sonny Liston, boxing fans are getting a chance to own a piece of one of the most hotly debated title fights of all time.

Both pairs of gloves from the May 25, 1965, bout in Lewiston, Maine — won by Ali with a first-round knockout from what some saw as a “phantom punch” — go up for auction Feb. 21 in New York. They are expected to fetch more than $1 million.

Footage of the fight does not make it clear whether Ali’s quick right hand actually connected, and many fans booed. Even the most famous photos of the fight show an enraged Ali standing over Liston as he lay on the canvas, gesturing and yelling at him to get up and fight.

Given the controversial way the bout ended, the boxers’ gloves were seized by George Russo, the boxing commissioner for Maine. The gloves remained in the Russo family until they were purchased several years ago by a California collector who is now selling them.

“The fight is one of the most, if not the most, controversial happenings in sports history. It’s still not solved today,” said Chris Ivy, director of sports auctions at Heritage Auctions, which is handling the sale. “It’s one of those things people discuss like the 1919 Chicago Black Sox Scandal. One of those controversial moments that is often coveted by memorabilia collectors.”

There have been many theories about what exactly happened: Did Liston, an ex-con known as the Big Bear, throw the fight because he was in debt to the mob? Or did Ali actually deliver a perfectly landed punch?

The Lewiston rematch was the first bout in which Ali stepped into the ring as Muhammad Ali after converting to Islam. He was still Cassius Clay a year earlier when he won the championship from Liston in Miami. His glove from that bout sold last year at Heritage Auctions for $836,500.

“Ali’s social influence is unrivaled among anyone,” said Seth Ersoff, a Los Angeles producer who is selling the gloves from the Lewiston rematch. “These gloves are the turning point of it all, when Cassius Clay became Muhammad Ali.”

Ersoff said he had coveted owning the “phantom punch” gloves for years but could never track them down until Frank Stallone, Sylvester Stallone’s brother, told him where he could get them and introduced him to Robert Russo, the nephew who inherited the set from his uncle.

Ersoff said he never displayed them because “there’s an awesome responsibility with ownership of something like that. … I kept them well-protected. I wanted to protect the DNA inside of them.”

With the upcoming golden anniversary of the bout, it seemed like the right moment “to put them up and see what happens,” he said. Ideally, he would love to see a museum purchase them.

Ali signed both pairs of gloves when he came to Lewiston in 1995 to celebrate the fight’s 30th anniversary. Liston died in 1970.

Sonny Liston story as a narrative, being constructed with a certain white male perspective

GERALDINE LISTON NARRATIVE VS WORLDVIEW OF SONNY LISTON 

“Know one new Sonny like I knew Sonny, I was always by his side. All they want to talk about are the lies”.- Geraldine Liston 

Mystery writers posing as sleuths, created a “logical fallacy” to strengthen their narrative, allowing the truth of Sonny Liston to be wrapped in fiction.

LOGICAL FALLACY


ad hominem

You attacked your opponent’s character or personal traits in an attempt to undermine their argument.

Ad hominem attacks can take the form of overtly attacking somebody, or more subtly casting doubt on their character or personal attributes as a way to discredit their argument. The result of an ad hom attack can be to undermine someone’s case without actually having to engage with it.

Example: After Sally presents an eloquent and compelling case for a more equitable taxation system, Sam asks the audience whether we should believe anything from a woman who isn’t married, was once arrested, and smells a bit weird.

Frank “Blinky” Palermo

In my research, I was finally able to find the Palermo family, and I was lucky enough to finally get a response from them about the relationship between “Blinky” Palermo and Sonny Liston in the past. ―I don‘t know much about boxing, but I do know my son and daughter‘s Grandfather was a good manager.. and I do know he treated all his fighters as his own sons and gave them food when they were hungry.He would bring the fighters home to meet the family… buy them clothes if they needed and even when they were down and out and without money.. he gave them money and a place to stay.. till they got on their feet… Some were champion boxers…, and when they got their purses, would blow their money as fast as they fought… My father in law was a good man … it hurts to see some writers put him down… they don‘t know the real man… they are just looking to make a buck … on someone‘s hide… I lived in Vegas about the time your grandfather died. Sonny Liston was a gentleman and a great fighter… the family all loved him. (Joani C. Palermo)

Sonny Liston’s heart attack, not an isolated problem, but a ignored global disease.

 

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains a major public health problem. It is the fourth leading cause of chronic morbidity and mortality in the United States, and is projected to rank fifth in 2020 in burden of disease worldwide, according to a study published by the World Bank/World Health Organization. Yet, COPD remains relatively unknown or ignored by the public as well as public health and government officials.

Read More: http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1164/rccm.200703-456so#.VqVbNxNVhHw

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,872 other followers